8 Easy Tips to Improve Your Blood Circulation

Every single minute of your life, five quarts of blood are pumped through your circulatory system, delivering oxygen and nutrients to all corners of your body. Inadequate blood circulation has far-reaching effects on your health.

Signs that your circulation may be less than optimal include coldness, numbness, or tingling in the hands or feet; swollen feet, ankles, and legs; digestive problems; muscle cramps; varicose veins; and memory loss or difficulty concentrating.

If you feel like it’s time to boost your circulation–or prevent circulation problems in the future—these tips to get your blood flowing is just for you.

1. Exercise regularly.

Exercise extends your life. It helps to prevent numerous diseases, and it keeps your weight under control. It promotes better energy, sleep, sex, and mood. Exercise is the number-one way to improve your blood circulation. According to the Centers for Disease Control, you should strive for 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (like brisk walking, tennis, water aerobics, yoga, or easy jogging) five days a week.

2. Hydrate often.

Adequate water intake is central to good circulation. It keeps your blood thin and flowing through your body at just the right rate. It also helps you flush out toxins in the blood. According to Harvard Medical School, how much water you should drink depends on a number of factors, including your body’s size and activity level. Their rule of thumb is to drink two to three cups of water each hour, or more if you’re sweating a lot.

3. Drink green tea.

Ditch your sugary drinks and consume green tea instead. This one lifestyle change can significantly improve your heart and vein health, according to Harvard Medical School. Green tea contains compounds called catechins and epicatechins, which reduce plaque buildup in the arteries and promote the circulation of blood to all areas of your body.

4. Reduce your stress.

Stress may contribute to inflammation in the circulatory system, which can increase your risk of heart attack, according to the American Psychological Association. Reducing your stress through exercise, yoga, meditation, deep breathing, or engaging in hobbies can help you maintain optimal blood circulation.

5. Move and stretch often.

Moving your body gets your blood flowing and stretching increases the blood flow to the tissues and organs in the body. If you tend to sit for prolonged periods of time, it’s crucial for your circulation to get up each hour, stretch your body, and move around for a few minutes.

Developing a yoga practice can go a long way in keeping your body feeling great and maximizing your circulation.

6. Dry brush your skin.

Not only does dry brushing your skin each day make it look and feel good, but it also aids detoxification and improves your circulation, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Dry brushing is just what it sounds like. Using a natural, stiff-bristled brush, you start at your feet and brush your skin in circular motions and long, fluid strokes.

7. Get a massage.

Regular massages stimulate blood flow and speed up circulation. Massage helps the body flush out lactic acid from the muscles and improves the circulation of the lymph fluid in your body, which carries away waste. Less metabolic waste throughout your body results in better circulatory function.

 

8. Take a supplement.

Many nutrients and substances are known to improve blood circulation. Nerveology’s Advanced Circulation Formula is a daily supplement containing proven research-based ingredients that help improve circulation and promote higher nitric oxide levels for greater vessel expansion. All-natural ingredients include L-Arginine, niacin, and ginger root.

Good circulation helps to ensure optimal overall health and making these simple lifestyle changes can improve your circulation quickly for better body and brain function, more energy, and a healthier circulatory system. You owe it to your body to have the best blood flow possible and if you follow these 8 tips, you’ll be well on your way.


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Sources:
health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-much-water-should-you-drink
health.harvard.edu/heart-health/brewing-evidence-for-teas-heart-benefits
apa.org/helpcenter/stress-body
health.clevelandclinic.org/the-truth-about-dry-brushing-and-what-it-does-for-you/

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